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Author Topic: Omaha Tribal Myths and Trickster Tales, by Roger Welsch  (Read 3999 times)
JimS
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« on: December 29, 2009, 10:23:41 PM »

This is not strictly a paranormal book, but...

I found this book while perusing the Lee Booksellers (Lincoln, NE) going out of business sale last Sunday. It caught my eye because of our road trip to Macy, NE, on the Omaha reservation last year. What interested me was the Blackbird Hill story, as we passed the hill on the way to and from Macy. Along with the Blackbird Hill story, which differs in several ways from the commonly distributed "white man's" version, there are several other native ghost tales in the last chapter.

Welsch treats the native culture, legends, and mythology with a deep reverence, and provides notes and commentary on each tale if it was available. The introduction gives a brief history of the Omaha and Ponca peoples, and Welsch expresses a deep anger at the treatment that Native Americans received from the US government, as well as strong admiration for the Omaha and the way they have persevered and preserved their culture.

I'm not very far into the book yet, but I can already tell that is was money well spent. This promises to be an engaging and enlightening collection of native lore, presented by an author who really cares about the subject matter. This is stuff you won't get from watching John Wayne movies.

Lee Booksellers still has several copies at a nice discount, and the doors will be open until everything in the store is sold.

Omaha Tribal Myths and Trickster Tales, by Roger Welsch
ISBN 0-934904-11-1
« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 10:16:04 PM by JimS » Logged

mgscherer
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« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2009, 11:34:17 PM »

Sounda like a book I will have to check out thanks Jim!
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Robin H
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2010, 09:15:30 PM »

I got a great book for Christmas-called

Battlefields of Nebraska
by Thomas D Phillips
I have only thumbed though it, but I cant wait to really dig in. There are also some maps.
So, If anyone would like to go on a road trip.... Im ready!
Although there are some that are very close to Lincoln.   
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Jacob
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« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2012, 03:46:12 PM »

Hello,
 
I am a new member here. I suppose I should write an introduction before I just start posting here, but I just wanted to
leave a quick reply to this topic.  Roger Welsch is well known amongst the UmoNhoN community here in Lincoln and the book
you are talking about is fantastic. I encourage anyone who is interested in stories and myths of the indians in this area to read this
book. It sits on my bookshelf and I pick it up often.  I myself am a member of the UmoNhon (Omaha) tribe.
 
I have always been interested in the paranormal and for as long as I can remember, I believed that spirits are among us. My mother
talked about spirits as if they were just a normal thing, so to us kids growing up, they were just a normal thing.  I plan on posting more
here and have enjoyed reading a lot of the topics.   
 
inshtamonze
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JimS
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« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2012, 09:36:23 PM »


Thanks for your comments, im. I enjoyed this book tremendously, and keep it around as a reference on some of the spirit stuff. It is a wonderful peek into the native mind and culture. Sometimes us "white folk" need to be reminded that not everyone thinks like we do.

Cheers,

-Jim
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Jacob
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« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2012, 07:55:41 AM »

I enjoyed reading about the investigation of the cemetary in Macy.  The woman quoted, Eleanor, she is my auntie.  I've never visited that cemetary so it was neat to read what you all had to say about it. 
 
It reminded me of my time down at Haskell.  Haskell is an all indian university down in Lawrence, Kansas. It opened as a boarding school around the 1880's I believe.  It has remained open, operating as a boarding school, a technical school etc... And now it is a fully accredited university for native students..It's come a long way.   
 
Several of the buildings on campus are extremely old  and there is a cemetary located on campus with headstones from the boarding school days. There are so many accounts of hauntings on campus that they even have a "haunted haskell" tour every year around halloween. 
 
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JimS
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« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2012, 07:39:59 PM »


That's really cool that you and Eleanor are related! I really enjoyed visiting the cemetery, it is a beautiful and peaceful spot. One of the park rangers that a member spoke with on a previous visit to the park was apparently spooked by something up there one time, and refuses to go there in the dark again. I felt a sense of reverence and history. I would like to go back someday and try to find the location of the mission school.

Cheers,

-Jim
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MattM - TornadoKnight
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« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2012, 01:55:08 PM »

That does sound like it would be an interesting investigation location.


Matt
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Jacob
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« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2012, 06:49:07 PM »

I hope to make it to some of your meetings in the future and if things worked out I would really like to go visit that cemetary as well. I would imagine that most of the spirits around there would be the spirits of youngsters, curious and mischevious but not harmful. That is why it reminded me of Haskell. . . Several of the reports on that campus are of children, and I'm not sure if I mentioned before, Haskell began as a boarding school. On the west end of campus there are some powwow grounds and there have been a lot of reports of seeing children playing about the grounds, or people hearing children playing, but none are seen. As well as around the campus cemetary, where a lot of children are buried. 
 
I can only imagine how a young persons spirit would not be at rest, being in a place like the boarding schools, where everything is foreign, culture stripped from them, and limited contact with their families. . .to become sick and die in a place like that would leave anyones soul to wander, especially a childs.
 
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Kerry
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« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2012, 06:55:06 PM »

I have also researched the Blackbird Hill history and snapped some full spectrum pics last fall.  Beautiful area!


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JimS
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« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2012, 10:10:52 PM »

Kerry,

It may interest you to know that the book that is the subject of this thread has a different version of the Blackbird Hill legend, supposedly closer to the original Omaha version and quite a bit different than the "white man's" version.

Cheers,

-Jim
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Roger
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« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2012, 08:56:17 PM »

Hi Inshtamonze, I am quite familiar with the spirit children legends that Native American's talk of.  Living with a young adult Pawnee, he has told me about the Spirit children and how they like to try and lure children away with them (especially at night).  Being a white man (yet open minded) I was just a bit skeptical about such legends until I actually experienced it for myself late one night about 2 yrs ago.  My friend and his younger sister (who was staying with us at the time) decided to go out for a walk late one night in early September.  It was a Wednesday night (actually past midnight) and school had already started and the small town where we live was very quiet that night.  As we walked to the edge of town I started to turn down the street that would eventually take us to the town cemetery located less than a quarter mile from town.  My friend stopped me dead in my tracks and said "No don't go that way, they're out there tonight" or something to that effect.  I have grown to respect his insight on things and agreed to walk the other way.  A short distance from there is the school so we walked there and the three of us sat down on the playground swings and began to chat.   Less than a half hour had passed when all three of us heard the unmistakable sound of children laughing, playing and calling out to each other.  We could tell which direction the sound was coming from (carried by a very slight breeze blowing from the south), it was coming from the cemetery!  We sat and listened to them for over five minutes before we all agreed it was time to leave.  That whole night was very surreal and other things happened that I won't go into at this time, but suffice to say that this one experience (among many others) made a believer out of me concerning Native American legends.   Hope to see you at one of our meetings.
Roger
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Jacob
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« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2012, 06:08:42 PM »

Hi ROger,
 
Thanks for the reply. I hope to visit your meetings soon.  It was probably a good thing that you and your friends decided to move along after hearing the children playing. . .I suppose everyone has different views on how much interaction they feel comfortable with when dealing with spirits.. As for myself, my mom and other relatives were always passing on little teachings to me throughout my life about dealing with spirits and things. While the existance  of spirits in our day to day lives  is a constant,  seeking them out, or seeking interaction with them for the most part was something that i was always told not to do, whether it was some unknown spirit or whether it was the spirit of a loved one or someone you knew. If it were the spirit of a loved one,  to seek them out or to keep them around is an impedement to that spirit. . . to call out for a lost loved one, or to wish for them to stay around would be selfish on my part. I would be keeping them from continuing their journey to where they are supposed to go. . .And if the spirit were some unknown, then I wouldn't want them to hang around as I don't know who they were or what they are capable of. 
 
There are a lot of teachings that to me, always seemed sort of trivial, but now that i sit here and try to recall them, they were obviously told to me for a reason.   
 
i better cut this short, i feel like i got a little bit rambly here. ha!
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Roger
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« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2012, 08:14:14 PM »

Hey Inshtamonze, Thanks for the reply.  I'm familiar with some of the things you spoke about in your reply.  Not sure if this is a Pawnee thing or Native American's in general but I've been told they should never mention the name of a loved one who has passed on at night for fear that they will come back to visit, but it's okay to say their name during the day.  The other thing I've been told is to keep the blinds closed on the windows at night as spirits may be passing by and look in at you.  This last one I am somewhat inclined to believe.
On a side note regarding the original topic of this thread, I know Roger Welsch personally, interesting man to talk with.
Roger
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